Studying the appearance of algorithms in popular culture and everyday life. By PlummerFernandez
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Humans Need Not Apply by CGP Grey

A short documentary about the automation of jobs and impending human redundancy. The film covers both mechanical labour superseded by robots and professional jobs such as doctors superseded by software bots. The filmmakers offer a provoking comparison to the redundancy of horses. I find this slightly flawed as possibly humans will need to continue to play a role in the economy as consumers, but complicated if their income is perhaps zero? The filmmakers also ignore that both Baxter and Watson have been designed to work alongside humans, so the future workforce could potentially be hybrid rather than one or the other (but in the supermarket checkout scenario it is clear this is not a 50/50 job-share). In any case the film’s final message is very well said: what to do with all the humans who are simply unemployable by no fault of their own? 




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Siri, Accessory to Murder via Independent 
So Siri assists a murderer:

US police say a Florida man accused of killing his roommate asked Apple’s digital assistant Siri for advice on hiding the body the day the man went missing. According to evidence reproduced from the trial by local news stations, Siri responded “What kind of place are you looking for?” before offering four options: “Swamps, reservoirs, metal foundries, dumps”.

But the iPhone data (including flashlight records!) gets him prosecuted:

Police say that Bravo was using the phone’s flashlight function to hide the body in the woods, and say that location data gathered from the smartphone doesn’t fit with Bravo’s account of his movements that evening. 

Siri, Accessory to Murder via Independent 

So Siri assists a murderer:

US police say a Florida man accused of killing his roommate asked Apple’s digital assistant Siri for advice on hiding the body the day the man went missing. According to evidence reproduced from the trial by local news stations, Siri responded “What kind of place are you looking for?” before offering four options: “Swamps, reservoirs, metal foundries, dumps”.

But the iPhone data (including flashlight records!) gets him prosecuted:

Police say that Bravo was using the phone’s flashlight function to hide the body in the woods, and say that location data gathered from the smartphone doesn’t fit with Bravo’s account of his movements that evening. 




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weirdudenergy



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Non-Stop Scroll Shop by Ghost Crab Workshop

An infinite online shop generated using Flickr, Amazon and Wordnik APIs. Some rather contentious items get generated such as ‘Oderless Zimbanweans' and 'Afghans, 13 big ones’, but there are plenty of funny and nonsensical ones too. 




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The tumblr recommendation algorithm sends me a message. 

The tumblr recommendation algorithm sends me a message. 




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noworkflow by Sam Newell

Noworkflow is a reaction to athletic aesthetics where a bot constantly updates this Tumblr account with randomly generated Photoshop images.

noworkflow by Sam Newell

Noworkflow is a reaction to athletic aesthetics where a bot constantly updates this Tumblr account with randomly generated Photoshop images.




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notational:

anniewerner:

Cory Arcangel’s new book is just tweets of people saying they’re working on their novel. This is simultaneously amazing and also forming a deep pit of despair in my gut.

A growing genre of API/search/program/collate as conceptual poetry (or literature).

Nice shift from twitter bot to printed publication. James Bridle also published a book of all his personal tweets, but Cory’s concept is stronger for making the conceptual marriage of tweets about wanting to complete a book, and completing a book with them. 

notational:

anniewerner:

Cory Arcangel’s new book is just tweets of people saying they’re working on their novel. This is simultaneously amazing and also forming a deep pit of despair in my gut.

A growing genre of API/search/program/collate as conceptual poetry (or literature).

Nice shift from twitter bot to printed publication. James Bridle also published a book of all his personal tweets, but Cory’s concept is stronger for making the conceptual marriage of tweets about wanting to complete a book, and completing a book with them. 

thefader.com



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Google Image Quiz (2014) by Silvio Lorusso
An online game/ search engine that reverses the role of the Google image search engine, it provides an image and you guess what query returned that image. Lorusso also manages the Post-Digital Publishing Archive (p-dpa.net, p-dpa.tumblr.com)

Google Image Quiz (2014) by Silvio Lorusso

An online game/ search engine that reverses the role of the Google image search engine, it provides an image and you guess what query returned that image. Lorusso also manages the Post-Digital Publishing Archive (p-dpa.net, p-dpa.tumblr.com)




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Reverse OCR, Darius Kazemi (2014) via p-dpa

I am a bot that grabs a random word and draws semi-random lines until the OCRad.js library recognizes it as the word.

The bot publishes to tumblr, twitter and the source code is available on github. Darius informs me that the bot takes about 64,000 attempts to achieve a word, to do this  It picks “dog” then draws random lines until “d” is detected, then draws random lines until “o” is detected…




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Who Ignored my Birthday? by Mike Lacher
An online service that accesses your Facebook account and compiles a list of those who ignored your birthday. I’ve only just come across Mike Lacher, so for beginners like me its also worth checking out The Geocitiesizer and the Upworthy Generator. Also the entire United States Constitution with Facebook Like buttons attached to every clause and amendment.

Who Ignored my Birthday? by Mike Lacher

An online service that accesses your Facebook account and compiles a list of those who ignored your birthday. I’ve only just come across Mike Lacher, so for beginners like me its also worth checking out The Geocitiesizer and the Upworthy Generator. Also the entire United States Constitution with Facebook Like buttons attached to every clause and amendment.




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System Focus: The Evolution of the Voice in the Digital Landscape



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Ocrad.js Optical Character Recognition in Javascript
The landing page for this software has a demo which inadvertently is a really addictive game where you try to write something in hope that the machine would accurately interpret your wobbly mouse skills. You can fork it on github and read notes on the readme file: 

a library such as Ocrad.js might be used to add handwriting input in a device and operating system agnostic manner. Oftentimes, capturing the strokes and sending them over to a server to process might entail unacceptably high latency.

Ocrad.js Optical Character Recognition in Javascript

The landing page for this software has a demo which inadvertently is a really addictive game where you try to write something in hope that the machine would accurately interpret your wobbly mouse skills. You can fork it on github and read notes on the readme file: 

a library such as Ocrad.js might be used to add handwriting input in a device and operating system agnostic manner. Oftentimes, capturing the strokes and sending them over to a server to process might entail unacceptably high latency.




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CyberSpaceLand (2003) by VJ ÜberGeek (Amy Alexander)

CyberSpaceLand is a VJing performance that turns search engine queries and results into nightclub visuals. 

- determined to transform the tools of technical toil into contraptions of coolness, thus providing a newly-confused vision of pop culture. Armed with air mouse, mobile keyboard and swanky clothes, Übergeek (Amy Alexander) performs a search engine. She inputs a search term into her custom search engine VJ software, and search engine results interactively animate in psychedelic colors and patterns ranging from Fischinger to Pong.




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Scream (2010) by Amy Alexander

Scream is software [Art] for the Windows desktop that responds to human screaming; it was inspired by the idea that software generally seems to assume its users are calm, focused, happy people. Software rarely acknowledges human frustration and dysfunctionality – not just with regard to people using software, but with regard to people in general.

The first version of scream was made in 2005, you can see it here




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"

Uber drivers are issued with a smartphone. At the end of a journey the smart phone sends details of the journey to a remotely based server and then receives by return the fare to be charged.

TfL’s [Transport For London] view is that smart phones that transmit location information (based on GPS data) between vehicles and operators, have no operational or physical connection with the vehicles, and receive information about fares which are calculated remotely from the vehicle, are not taximeters within the meaning of the legislation. [Only registered black-cabs can legally use taximeters in London]

"


―via CNET. Incredible legal loophole made possible because now most computation happens in remote servers. I wonder how many other loopholes arise from cloud computing. 



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